Dora’s Pattern Book 1829

Dora’s Pattern Book 1829
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WENTWORTH, Dora. Manuscript white work  pattern book. Watermarked Whatman for 1829. Pp 160 of manuscript  patterns, all carefully drawn in ink on fine paper many pages numbered. Bound in half morocco with marbled paper covered boards , with some losses to the covering and surface loss to th3 leather. Spine and leaves are all tight and intact. Ownership inscription of Dora Wentworth to the front free endpaper, with a small quantity of loosely inserted additions including patterns for a collar, drawn on the back of a letter from the Soldier's Orphan Asylum in Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, dated 1855,  inserted  at a later date. We understand that the patterns are for “ whitework”, which is white embroidery on white linen, as in broderie anglaise. This is an entirely original Georgian manuscript, complete, and in Very Good condition. A most delightful album, absolutely representative of the design of the period. 

 

[Dora Harriet Wentworth, daughter of  Godfrey Wentworth (1773 - 1834) and Amelia Wentworth (neé Hawksworth) - patrons of the writer and artist Edward Lear. It is probably through Mrs Wentworth that Lear gained employment at the Zoological Society and began working for Prideaux John Selby. An album of zoological drawings dated 1830 is dedicated to her family 'in acknowledgement of their kindness towards him'.

 Dora married Sir Samuel Hancock of the Yeomen of the Guard  in 1831, whose residence is recorded as Brilwete House Oxfordshire. The Wentworths were one of the most prominent land-owning families in Yorkshire. Sir Thomas Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse married Beatrice Woodrove of Woolley, near Wakefield in around1514, but a branch of the family was established at Woolley in 1599, when Michael Wentworth purchased an estate from Francis Woodruffe (or Woodrove), whose family had owned land there since the fourteenth century. Woolley Hall is a Jacobean building, dating from 1635, with many later alterations. The surrounding landscape park is largely unchanged since 1800, and includes wooded pleasure grounds. The Brotherton Library holds a considerable number of documents and maps relating to the Wentworth family of Woolley and its estates. This branch of the Wentworth family had its seat at Woolley Hall, about five miles south of Wakefield.  In 1947, Woolley Hall was sold to the West Riding County Council and latterly Wakefield Council owned the building until 2015.The Hall now apparently  belongs to a private developer.]

£850.00


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